Tag Archives: Director

Kobalt Signs Childish Gambino

Kobalt, a music and technology company built for artists, songwriters, publishers and labels as an alternative to the traditional music business model, announced that it has signed Grammy award winning, actor, comedian, writer, director, producer, singer, songwriter, rapper, and DJ, Donald Glover, a.k.a., Childish Gambino. The worldwide agreement includes publishing administration, including global synch and creative support services, for all of Childish Gambino’s future songs after the Awaken, My Love! album. In addition, Kobalt has signed Wolf + Rothstein, Glover’s musical teams of collective songwriters and artists for publishing administration, global synch and creative support services.

Said Kobalt Music SVP, Creative, Al McLean, of the deal, “Donald is one of those rare multi-talented artists who can do it all. It’s an honor to sign Donald and Wolf + Rothstein Collective to the Kobalt family.”

Emmy-, Golden Globe-, and Grammy-winning actor, writer, comedian, DJ, and rapper Donald Glover broke into pop culture mainstream first on the hit TV sitcom Community after serving on the writing staff of both The Daily Show and 30 Rock. In August 2011, he signed to Glassnote Records under his rap moniker Childish Gambino and has since released two albums. Glover also currently stars in the FX series Atlanta, which he also created and occasionally directs.

Operating out of Temple Studios in Los Angeles, Wolf + Rothstein is the creative agency comprised of Golden Globe and Emmy Award winner Donald Glover, Wolf Taylor, and Fam Rothstein, all whom worked with the band that helped compose the critically acclaimed Awaken My Love! Released December 2, 2017, Awaken My Love! and the chart-topping hit single “Redbone” are nominated for five Grammy Awards: Album of the Year, Record of the Year, Best Traditional R&B Performance (winner), Best R&B Song, and Best Urban Contemporary Album. Childish Gambino is set to perform on Saturday Night Live on May 5, 2018.

“Wolf and Rothstein is excited to partner with Kobalt for publishing,” said Wolf Taylor of Wolf + Rothstein. “We’re looking forward to growing the roster together.”

The Martin Lawrence “Lit AF Tour” With Rickey Smiley, Michael Blackson, Bruce Bruce, And More

Our folks at just gave us the info on the Martin Lawrence “Lit AF Tour” and we can’t believe all the big comedians on the ticket. From Bruce Bruce, to Adele Givens, to Deon Cole & Jay Pharoah… The tour is going to be more popping than any other.

Comedian, actor, director and producer Martin Lawrence will return to the stage as the host of  2018’s hottest comedy event: the LIT AF Tour, featuring an amazing lineup of comedic talent.  Coming off the 20th anniversary of  Def Comedy Jam, where he is known for his legendary hosting, Lawrence has made a triumphant return to the stand-up stage wowing audiences with his signature style of hilarious stories, social commentary and more. The LIT AF Tour stars Lawrence as your high-powered host who presents a fire lineup of comedians including DeRay Davis, JB Smoove, Rickey Smiley, Michael Blackson, Jay Pharoah, Deon Cole, Bruce Bruce, Adele Givens and Benji Brown.

Kicking off on March 31 in Atlantic City, the LIT AF Tour will make stops in at least 16 cities across the country this Spring including engagements at Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas, Barclays Center in New York and Capital One Arena in Washington, DC. Tickets go on sale to the general public beginning Friday, February 16. American Express® Card Members can purchase tickets beginning Wednesday, February 14. The lineup and on sale date for each show can be found in the tour itinerary below.

Martin Lawrence started in stand-up comedy at the legendary The Improv, where he honed his talents until he was asked by Russell Simmons to host his groundbreaking comedy series Def Comedy Jam on HBO. From there, Lawrence became a household name after his hugely popular self-titled TV show, Martin, was an instant hit with TV viewers. He starred for five years as not only the title character, but other support characters like the sassy Sheneneh and Mama Payne, who became comedy classics. Lawrence would later go on to star in comedy blockbusters like Bad Boys 1&2 A Thin Line Between Love and Hate, which he also directed and Big Momma’s House, 1, 2 & 3 where he once again proved his talent for creating and acting as multiple characters in one storyline.

MARTIN LAWRENCE LIT AF TOUR DATES

Atlantic City Boardwalk Hall Saturday, March 31 On sale Wednesday 2/28 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, DeRay Davis, Michael Blackson, Adele Givens, Benji Brown*

Los Angeles Microsoft Theater Friday, April 06 On sale Friday 2/16 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, DeRay Davis, Rickey Smiley, Michael Blackson, Benji Brown*

Las Vegas Mandalay Bay Events Center Saturday, April 07 On sale Friday 2/16 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, Deon Cole, Rickey Smiley, Bruce Bruce, Benji Brown*

Oakland Oracle Arena Sunday, April 08 On sale Friday 2/16 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, Deon Cole, Michael Blackson, Jay Pharoah, Adele Givens*

Atlanta Philips Arena Friday, April 13 On sale Friday 2/16 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Michael Blackson, Adele Givens, Benji Brown*

Columbia Colonial Life Arena Saturday, April 14 On sale Friday 2/23 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, Rickey Smiley, Michael Blackson, Adele Givens, Benji Brown*

New York Barclays Center Friday, April 20 On sale Saturday 2/17 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Deon Cole, Adele Givens, Benji Brown*

Saint Louis Chaifetz Arena Thursday, May 03 On sale Friday 2/23 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, DeRay Davis, JB Smoove, Rickey Smiley, Benji Brown*

Kansas City Sprint Center Friday, May 04 On sale Friday 2/23 at Noon

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Jay Pharoah, Adele Givens, Benji Brown*

Tampa USF Sun Dome Thursday, May 10 On sale Friday 3/2 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Rickey Smiley, Michael Blackson, Benji Brown*

Miami American Airlines Arena Friday, May 11 On sale Friday 3/2 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Michael Blackson, Bruce Bruce, Benji Brown*

Houston NRG Arena Saturday, May 26 On sale Friday 2/23 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Rickey Smiley, Jay Pharoah, Benji Brown*

Chicago UIC Pavilion Friday, June 08 On sale Friday 3/2 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, DeRay Davis, JB Smoove, Rickey Smiley, Adele Givens*

Washington, DC Capital One Arena Saturday, June 09 On sale Friday 3/2 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, DeRay Davis, JB Smoove, Rickey Smiley, Adele Givens*

Nashville Bridgestone ArenaFriday, June 15 On sale Friday 3/2 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Rickey Smiley, Jay Pharoah, Adele Givens*

Memphis FedEx Forum Saturday, June 16 On sale Friday 2/23 at 10am

Martin Lawrence, JB Smoove, Bruce Bruce, Jay Pharoah, Adele Givens*

*Lineups subject to change

Warner Bros. Pictures Celebrates 50 Years of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey

‘Unrestored’ 70mm print of Kubrick’s landmark 1968 masterpiece to be released in select U.S. theatres, following world premiere at the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, introduced by filmmaker Christopher Nolan.

WB

BURBANK, Calif.–Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, Warner Bros. Pictures will debut an ‘unrestored’ 70mm print of the director’s groundbreaking science fiction epic at the 71st annual Cannes Film Festival. Widely considered among the greatest films of the 20th century, 2001: A Space Odyssey will return to select U.S. theatres in 70mm beginning May 18, 2018.

Set for Saturday, May 12, the world premiere will be held during the Cannes Classics section of the Festival, featuring an introduction by award-winning filmmaker Christopher Nolan. The screening will also be attended by members of Stanley Kubrick’s family, including his daughter, Katharina Kubrick, and longstanding producing partner and brother-in-law, Jan Harlan.

For the first time since the original release, this 70mm print was struck from new printing elements made from the original camera negative. This is a true photochemical film recreation. There are no digital tricks, remastered effects, or revisionist edits.

This is the unrestored film that recreates the cinematic event audiences experienced 50 years ago.

A longtime admirer of the late American auteur, Nolan worked closely with the team at Warner Bros. Pictures throughout the mastering process.

Christiane Kubrick said, “I’m delighted that 2001: A Space Odyssey will be reissued in 70mm, and that Cannes has chosen to honour it. If Stanley were alive today, we know he would be in admiration of the films of Christopher Nolan. And so, on behalf of Stanley’s family, I would personally like to thank Christopher for supporting his film.”

Nolan stated, “One of my earliest memories of cinema is seeing Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, in 70mm, at the Leicester Square Theatre in London with my father. The opportunity to be involved in recreating that experience for a new generation, and of introducing our new unrestored 70mm print of Kubrick’s masterpiece in all its analogue glory at the Cannes Film Festival is an honour and a privilege.”

Nolan will also participate in a Cannes Masterclass, set for Sunday, May 13, during which he will discuss his highly acclaimed filmography and also share his passion for the singular work of Stanley Kubrick.

For this milestone anniversary, Warner Bros. will continue the celebration later this year when Warner Bros. Home Entertainment releases 2001: A Space Odyssey for the first time in 4K resolution with HDR. Also produced in close collaboration with Nolan, the home entertainment release will be available in the fall of 2018.

With 2001: A Space Odyssey, director Stanley Kubrick redefined the limits of filmmaking and cemented his legacy as one of the most revolutionary and influential film directors of all time. Originally released in 70mm Cinerama roadshow format on April 4, 1968, the film ignited the imaginations of critics and audiences alike and its impact continues to resonate to this day.

An award-winning director, writer and producer, Christopher Nolan most recently earned dual Academy Award nominations, for Best Director and Best Picture, for his experiential tour-de-force Dunkirk, which in July of 2017 received the largest 70mm release in the last quarter century. His diverse filmography also includes Interstellar, Inception, the blockbuster Dark Knight Trilogy, The Prestige and Memento, for which he received his first Oscar nomination, for Best Original Screenplay.

David Byrne Achieves First Top 10 Album on Billboard 200 Chart With ‘American Utopia’

Written By | Keith Caulfield

David Byrne earns his highest charting album ever on the Billboard 200 chart as American Utopia enters at No. 3 with 63,000 equivalent album units earned in the week ending March 15, according to Nielsen Music.

The Billboard 200 chart ranks the most popular albums of the week in the U.S. based on multi-metric consumption, which includes traditional album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA). The new March 24-dated chart (where Byrne debuts at No. 3 and Logic’s Bobby Tarantino II starts at No. 1) will be posted in full on Billboard‘s websites on Tuesday, March 20.

Byrne’s debut — his 12th charting solo set — is driven by traditional album sales, as effectively all of its units were in pure sales, resulting in Byrne’s biggest sales week since Nielsen Music began tracking sales in 1991. American Utopia’s arrival was enhanced by sales generated from a concert ticket/album sale redemption offer with the artist’s tour, which started earlier in March.

 

American Utopia is Byrne’s first solo effort since 2004’s Grown Backwards, which debuted and peaked at No. 178. Since then, he’s released a trio of collaborative efforts: Everything That Happens Will Happen Today, with Brian Eno (No. 174 in 2009), Here Lies Love, with Fatboy Slim (No. 96, 2010) and Love This Giant, with St. Vincent (No. 23, 2012). The latter was Byrne’s highest charting album, and only top 40 set, until the arrival of American Utopia.

Byrne made his solo debut on the list in 1981 with The Catherine Wheel, which topped out at No. 104 in 1982.

The band Talking Heads, of which Byrne was a member, charted a dozen albums on the Billboard 200 between 1977 and 2009. Eight of them reached the top 40, with the act’s highest-charting effort being 1983’s Speaking in Tongues. The album reached No. 15, powered by its hit single “Burning Down the House.” The track was the band’s only top 10 on the Billboard Hot 100, climbing to No. 9.

Byrne’s new album was led by the single “Everybody’s Coming to My House,” which has reached No. 5 on the most recently published Adult Alternative Songs airplay chart (dated March 17).

PACIFIC RIM

The globe-spanning conflict between otherworldly monsters of mass destruction and the human-piloted super-machines built to vanquish them was only a prelude to the all-out assault on humanity in Pacific Rim Uprising.

John Boyega (Star Wars: The Force Awakens) stars as the rebellious Jake Pentecost, a once-promising Jaeger pilot whose legendary father gave his life to secure humanity’s victory against the monstrous “Kaiju.”  Jake has since abandoned his training only to become caught up in a criminal underworld.  But when an even more unstoppable threat is unleashed to tear through our cities and bring the world to its knees, he is given one last chance to live up to his father’s legacy by his estranged sister, Mako Mori (Rinko Kikuchi)—who is leading a brave new generation of pilots that have grown up in the shadow of war.  As they seek justice for the fallen, their only hope is to unite together in a global uprising against the forces of extinction.

Jake is joined by gifted rival pilot Lambert (The Fate of the Furious’ Scott Eastwood) and 15-year-old Jaeger hacker Amara (newcomer Cailee Spaeny), as the heroes of the PPDC become the only family he has left.  Rising up to become the most powerful defense force to ever walk the earth, they will set course for a spectacular all-new adventure on a towering scale.

Pacific Rim Uprising is directed by Steven S. DeKnight (Netflix’s Daredevil, STARZ’s Spartacus) and also stars Jing Tian, Burn Gorman, Adria Arjona and Charlie Day.

IN THEATRES MARCH 23, 2018

Enter To Win 2 Tickets!  (offer expires March 16)

Oscars 2018: Complete list of winners

Written By | Andrea Park

The 90th Academy Awards nominations marked an unpredictable Oscars race, but “The Shape of Water,” which had 13 nominations, won big with four awards, including best picture and best director. Guillermo del Toro said in his best director acceptance speech, “I think the greatest thing the industry does is erase the line in the sand. We should continue doing that, when the world tells us to make it deeper.”

Jimmy Kimmel hosted the show again from Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre, and this year’s show had a unique focus on women, with four actresses presenting the top two acting categories, along with three of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual misconduct accusers, Ashley Judd, Salma Hayek and Annabella Sciorra, introducing a video about the #MeToo movement and inclusion in Hollywood. However, neither Greta Gerwig, the fifth female director ever to be nominated for an Oscar, nor Rachel Morrison, the first female cinematographer to pick up an Oscar nod, won an award.

Here’s the full list of Oscar winners

Best picture

“The Shape of Water”

Best actress

Frances McDormand, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

Best actor

Gary Oldman, “Darkest Hour”

Best director

Guillermo del Toro, “The Shape of Water”

Best original song

“Remember Me” by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez from “Coco”

Best original score

Alexandre Desplat, “The Shape of Water”

Best cinematography

Roger Deakins, “Blade Runner 2049”

Best original screenplay

Jordan Peele, “Get Out”

Best adapted screenplay

James Ivory, “Call Me By Your Name”

Best live action short film

“The Silent Child”

Best documentary short subject

“Heaven is a Traffic Jam on the 405”

Best film editing

Lee Smith, “Dunkirk”

Best visual effects

John Nelson, Gerd Nefzer, Paul Lambert and Richard R. Hoover, “Blade Runner 2049”

Best animated feature film

“Coco”

Best animated short film

Dear Basketball

Best supporting actress

Allison Janney, “I, Tonya”

Best foreign language film

“A Fantastic Woman,” Chile

Best production design

Paul Denham Austerberry, Shane Vieau, Jeffrey Melvin, “The Shape of Water”

Best sound editing

Richard King and Alex Gibson, “Dunkirk”

Best sound mixing

Mark Weingarten, Gregg Landaker, Gary Rizzo, “Dunkirk”

Best documentary feature

“Icarus”

Best costume design

Mark Bridges, “Phantom Thread”

Best makeup and hairstyling

Kazuhiro Tsuji, Lucy Sibbick and David Malinowski, “Darkest Hour”

Best supporting actor

Sam Rockwell, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”

‘Atlanta’ Season 2 Is Off to a Weird, Perfect Start

The premiere of the FX hit show’s new chapter reacquaints us with familiar faces and introduces some exciting new ones, including Katt Williams and his unconventional house pet

Written By |  

Even in a TV landscape characterized by peak drama and rare authenticity, critics and awards bodies and audiences all seemed to agree that the first season of Atlanta was exceptionally good, for many reasons. One of the show’s most impressive tricks was its insistence on subverting expectations at every available turn, whether those expectations were set by viewers, studio execs, or by Donald Glover himself. “Twin Peaks for rappers” fits neatly into 140 characters, and the conceit (a Princeton dropout, an aging rapper, and a space cadet tumble headlong through the Atlanta rap scene) seemed simple enough, but Atlanta was more ambitious than its creator’s elevator pitch in execution. And way weirder. There was an invisible car. There was a sketch comedy half-hour. Justin Bieber was black. Quavo went all Russell Baze on a dude in the woods using a hunting rifle he named “Percy.”

But you don’t need me to tell you that Atlanta was good and memorable. Now that “Robbin’ Season” (which means more and sounds cooler than “Season 2”) has arrived, the show will speak for itself once more. And we’ll all see what we loved about it in the first place: that Atlanta is still playing straw caterpillar with reality; that the show is still funny but not that kind of funny; that its choices are still thrillingly specific; that its use of guest stars still feels both whimsical and effective.

The problem is that I want to talk only about Katt Williams. We may talk about some other things by accident, but Williams—who is gloriously, hilariously, tragically pressed in the premiere—is the most pressing topic.

I guess we have to talk about where we left the principle characters; Atlanta has been off the air since the Season 1 finale in November 2016. Alfred, known to the internet as Paper Boi (Brian Tyree Henry), dropped a mixtape with a solid street single that his cousin-manager Earn (Glover) pledged to help transform into a full-on rap career. By roll credits, Earn’s only sort of succeeded at growing Paper Boi’s reach. Earn’s only sort of succeeded at a few things: keeping a roof over his head, getting his daughter into a decent school, working things out with his baby mama (Van, played by Zazie Beetz), figuring out what it is he wants out of life. The only thing he’s done successfully for sure is befriend Darius (Lakeith Stanfield), and thank God, because who among us wouldn’t want a friend like Darius?

If Season 1 ended on a note of fragile optimism, the premiere of “Robbin’ Season”feels defined by a simmering panic, like the anxiety that stampedes back in once a high wears off, like the dread of knowing you’ll have to either make decisions or have them made for you soon. The season premiere opens with Earn getting forced out of the storage unit he had been living in, and it’s three full minutes before any other familiar characters are shown. There’s a detached cold open that follows two new young men around the twist of a boring, gray winter day that suddenly turns violent. They play FIFA, they talk music, they decide that they’re hungry, they go to Mrs. Winner’s—a fictive version of the real chicken and biscuits spot, and one that doubles as a drug front. They rob the place, it turns bloody, it sets the tone: This is still Atlanta, but the stakes are irretrievably higher than they were two years ago. Disaster strikes elsewhere when Alfred, on house arrest, sends Earn over to his Uncle Willy’s after having received a call from Uncle Willy’s girlfriend, Yvonne, who said that Willy had “kidnapped” her. As it turns out, Uncle Willy is Katt Williams.

And he looks good, but, crucially, not great. At least as bad as when he retired from stand-up six years ago on KOMO 4 Seattle News dressed in a Kurt Cobain tee and ski goggles, and on purpose. Since his mid-2000s success, Williams’s fall from grace has been exceedingly long and noisy; in 2016 alone he was arrested four times for everything from “criminal damage to property” to sucker-punching a seventh-graderduring a friendly pickup soccer game. He’s back to doing stand-up now, though. He released a Netflix special in mid-January, Great America, where he talks into a golden microphone about racial tension and Trumpism, but also about the ways in which life—and he has lived a life—changed him.

It makes sense that someone like Williams would wash up on an absurdist show preoccupied with personal transition, but it’s still a surprise when he presses his face up against the screen door, and remarkable that his inclusion works so seamlessly. And so well.

To the extent that time is real in Atlanta, it’s mid-afternoon by the time we meet Willy, and he is still wearing a bathrobe. Think of him as a much older Money Mike; the pimping is mostly dead and the alligator shoes are just house slippers now, although he does still have the alligator. A full-grown Caiman. Really.

The best of Williams’s performance coincides with the cops showing up, responding to a domestic disturbance call. “We not domestic, we ain’t eem married,” he explains with great annoyance. You really do forget that nobody willfully misreads things or demands more than their due respect quite like Katt Williams does. His act—which is also, historically speaking, his public face—is that he’s short, and it’s funny in a sometimes-sad way. He is desperate, but acidic; paranoid and uncool, but composed at the same time. Williams is perfect as Uncle Willy because Williams is Uncle Willy. Either might ask, with a crazed look in their eye and a cigarette hanging out of their mouth, what is youuuuuuu doin’ here.

Williams gets a big moment near the end of the episode, and it’s up to you whether it counts as redemption, given the decade he’s had. To set it up: After Willy needles the idea that Paper Boi has outgrown Earn’s usefulness, Earn does something he hasn’t since the third episode of the first season, almost two and a half years in real time. He says how he feels. “What I’m scared of is being you. You know, somebody everybody knew was smart but ended up being a know-it-all, fuck-up Jay that just lets shit happen to him.” Life has plainly not worked out for Willy; there are cracks in the ceiling above their heads, and Fulton County PD is at the front door.

Damn,” Williams says, and for what it’s worth, I also said “damn.” It’s one of those moments that bridges Atlanta’s surreality and the physical world. Willy/Williams becomes, unambiguously, what Earn/Glover has to grow beyond, and it’s striking, dispossessing. “If you don’t wanna end up like me,” Williams says, “get rid of that chip-on-your-shoulder shit. It’s not worth the time.”

He busts out the back door to skitter off into the sunset after that. Willy’s exit doesn’t magically solve his nephew’s insecurity. This is Atlanta as it ever was: reliably human, and reserved in its commentary on that humanity.

Costume Designer Paco Delgado On Creating Celestial Couture For ‘A Wrinkle In Time’

The Oscar-nominated costume designer, who compares his work to haute couture, shares two exclusive sketches with THR.

It’s not every day that a costume designer is called upon to dress not one but three supernatural superstars — Mrs. Which (Oprah Winfrey) who appears as a shimmering beam of light, Mrs. Whatsit (Reese Witherspoon) as a former centaur, and Mrs. Who (Mindy Kaling) as a literature-spouting wise woman.

But such was the case for Paco Delgado, Oscar nominee for his work on The Danish Girl and Les Miserables, who was charged with designing the costumes for Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of the 1962 Madeleine L’Engle book A Wrinkle In Time, Disney’s highly-anticipated science fiction fantasy film hitting U.S. theaters March 9.

The film also stars Storm Reid as heroine Meg Murry, who travels through the universe with her brother Charles Wallace (Deric McCabe) and friend Calvin (Levi Miller) on a journey of self-discovery while in search of her physicist father (Chris Pine) who is trapped on the planet of Camazotz. Gugu Mbatha-Raw plays the microbiologist mother Dr. Kate Murry.

But enough about the real-world characters who wear jeans, T-shirts and flannels while speaking a bit too earnestly and hugging a bit too profusely. The fantastical attire of the three supernatural beings steals the show.

Reese Witherspoon as Mrs. Whatsit in a dress inspired by bed linens and calla lilies, according to Delgado.
Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures
Reese Witherspoon as Mrs. Whatsit in a dress inspired by bed linens and calla lilies, according to Delgado.

Some of the costumes for the trio of celestial beings took 7 or 8 weeks to make, Delgado told THR in an exclusive interview at Walt Disney Studios earlier this week. “I have to say that this time I felt the most close to working on something similar to haute couture,” he says. “When you create costumes, you use fabric and sew and it’s always complex, but not this level of complexity.  We were embroidering hand-cast molded plastic beads that we created in a warehouse especially for the movie, pleating neoprene and metal mesh. We worked with artists and people who used to work in couture, some who create stage costumes for rock stars or for Cher to wear at her show in Las Vegas.”

Costume designer Paco Delgado at work with mood boards and fabrics for “A Wrinkle In Time.”
Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures
Costume designer Paco Delgado at work with mood boards and fabrics for “A Wrinkle In Time.”

The three celestial beings have distinctive personalities, communicated in large part by their dress. “Mrs. Which is energy in the pure state,” says Delgado of Winfrey’s armor-like garb and spiked jewelry that exudes strength. “She has been a star, a supernova that exploded. She’s a warrior who has been in the universe battling against the forces of evil, so that came through with the use of metallic. Oprah’s costumes were very technically complex because we were using materials that we’re not used to like neoprene, plastic, metal and optic fiber.”

“Mrs. Whatsit was very playful; she came from a planet called Uriel that is an ecological paradise, so she needed to be more in contact with nature,” says Delgado of Witherspoon’s undulating goddess gowns. “I was thinking about hummingbirds and butterflies and fish tails in a pond and the shapes of flowers and leaves, marbling and color. At the beginning of the book, Mrs. Whatsit is stealing bed linens from the clothes lines, so I tried to get bed linens on a mannequin and make something and I thought how interesting all the pleating and folds were, but I wanted to create something much more sculptural and abstract. Then I looked at a calla lily flower and thought, ‘It would be amazing if we could make that into a dress.’ Reese’s dresses may be very simple in the idea but very complex in the structure, making all the ruching stand up and creating movement. Her multi-color dress was made of silks and velvets and many fabrics and we added in a lot of painting and printing.”

Mrs. Whatsit morphs into a centaur on the planet Uriel, an ecological paradise reflected in the colors of her dress.

“Mindy’s character, Mrs. Who, was very ethnic-al,” says Delgado in reference to the colorful, multi-culti vibe of Kaling’s costumes, many with quilted detailing. “She spoke in quotes from books, so I thought, ‘She’s the super-librarian of the universe.’ She has all the knowledge of all the cultures in the universe, even extraterrestrial cultures. But because she’s taken on this human shape to help Meg, I thought it would be good if her dresses drew on influences from the earth like Japanese kimonos, African prints, South American embroidery, all mixed together in a sort of cocktail. They were a lot of work in terms of the embroidery and fabric dying. The primal idea behind her dresses is books, and books are made of layers so you’ll see layer after layer like the pages, sometimes printed with written words. We are in a culture where we have message T-shirts and Tommy Hilfiger logos and graffiti artists printing things in the streets so we wrote on her costumes in Latin calligraphy and Arabic and Chinese and we even made up a new alphabet she could be using from another world.”

Mindy Kaling as Mrs. Who in a layered dress printed with words that mimics pages of a book.
Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures
Mindy Kaling as Mrs. Who in a layered dress printed with words that mimics pages of a book.

Asked whether he thinks of a signature to his costume work, Delgado zeroes in on color: “Psychology is so intermingled with color. We all immediately understand what red means, what blue means. It is a very powerful tool and can express so much.”

Two standout scenes during the intergalactic journey (one a kaleidoscopic seaside resort and another set in ‘50s-inspired suburbia) pop off the screen, thanks to the vibrantly colored costumes that convey an otherworldly, dreamlike experience that is not dissimilar to the saturated, three-strip Technicolor scenes in “The Wizard Of Oz” that Delgado points out has a similarly thematic heroine’s journey.

As for working with DuVernay, Delgado says: “Ava is a really strong director with a lot of very strong ideas, which is very good. I love that. She gives you the parameters in which you have to work so you don’t get lost in the stars.”

Rent 20th Anniversary Tour at Fox Theatre

In 1996, an original rock musical by a little-known composer opened on Broadway…and forever changed the landscape of American theatre. Two decades later, Jonathan Larson’s RENT continues to speak loudly and defiantly to audiences across generations and all over the world. And now, this Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award®-winning masterpiece returns to the stage in a vibrant 20th anniversary touring production.

A re-imagining of Puccini’s La BohèmeRENT follows an unforgettable year in the lives of seven artists struggling to follow their dreams without selling out. With its inspiring message of joy and hope in the face of fear, this timeless celebration of friendship and creativity reminds us to measure our lives with the only thing that truly matters—love.

Get Your Tickets!

Please Note: RENT is a story which addresses adult themes and controversial issues. Parental guidance is suggested. It is not recommended for children under 13.

See more upcoming events..

 

Atlanta Ballet Presents Black Swan

A mixed rep program featuring Swan Lake Act III and a world premiere by Craig Davidson

ATLANTA – In March, Atlanta Ballet presents two sensational works
highlighting the rich legacy and promising future of classical dance. Audiences will fall under the spell of the iconic third act of Marius Petipa’s Swan Lake, staged by Atlanta Ballet Artistic Director Gennadi Nedvigin. This timeless masterpiece is complimented by the world premiere of Remembrance/Hereafter from emerging choreographer Craig Davidson, exhibiting the extraordinary versatility of Atlanta Ballet dancers.

Audiences will have the chance to witness the exquisite choreography of “The Father of
Classical Ballet” with the splendor of Swan Lake Act III. Petipa’s celebrated work exudes
passion, choreographic complexity, and technical brilliance. Building upon the tradition of the classical masters, Australian choreographer Craig Davidson presents a transformative world premiere showcasing the transcendence of dance. This sublime new work will be accompanied by a live quartet performing Franz Schubert’s “Death and the Maiden” to give audiences a truly immersive experience.

“Along with the expressive dexterity of movement in Craig Davison’s spectacular world
premiere, it is enthralling to witness Atlanta Ballet Company members bring fresh energy to the celebrated excellence of Swan Lake,” shared Artistic Director Gennadi Nedvigin. “This mixed-repertory program gives Atlanta audiences the opportunity to experience a well-balanced array of folkloric, classical, and contemporary dance styles.”

Atlanta Ballet’s Black Swan mixed repertory program runs for four performances from Friday, March 16 to Sunday, March 18 at the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre – 2800 Cobb Galleria Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30339. To purchase tickets, visit www.atlantaballet.com

Swan Lake Act III
Choreography by Marius Petipa & staged by Gennadi Nedvigin
From one of the most celebrated classical ballets in history, Swan Lake Act III marks the
pivotal moment in which Prince Sigfried mistakes Odile, daughter of the evil sorcerer Von Rothbart, for his true love, Odette. Captivated by her sorcery, the beguiled Prince Siegfried dances with Odile in the famed Black Swan Pas de Deux from which the program borrows its title. Atlanta Ballet Artistic Director Gennadi Nedvigin will stage this choreographic masterpiece, leaving audiences enchanted by its poignant evocations and precise technicality.

World Premiere: Remembrance/Hereafter
Praised internationally for his impassioned, sinuous movements, Craig Davidson has worked alongside world-renowned choreographers including William Forsythe, Jiří Kylián, Mats Ek, David Dawson, Wayne McGregor, Jacopo Godani, Nicolo Fonte, Jorma Elo, and Alexander Ekman. Staged on Atlanta Ballet dancers, the world premiere of Remembrance/Hereafter will be accompanied by a live quartet to provide audiences with a distinctive sensory experience.